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Events of Interest

06

Nov
2013

In Events of Interest

By Laura Kane

Ray Siemens, “Building Blocks of the Social Scholarly Edition” – Mon 11/11, 4:15p-5:30p, Rooms 9204/9205

On 06, Nov 2013 | In Events of Interest | By Laura Kane

Please join CUNY DHI and the Digital Praxis Seminar for a talk by Ray Siemens on the digital social edition.

This event will take place on Monday, November 11, 2013 from 4:15-5:30pm at the CUNY Graduate Center in Room 9204/9205, and is free to attend and open to the public.We request you RSVP here: RSVP with Eventbrite (not required)

“Building Blocks of the Social Scholarly Edition”

This talk explores elements of the scholarly edition in the context of new and emerging social media from two pertinent perspectives: the first from the foundational perspective of its theoretical context, particularly as that context intersects with a utility-based consideration of the toolkit that allows us to consider the social edition as an extension of the traditions in which it is situated and which it has the potential to inform productively; the second is from the perspective of an iterative implementation of one such edition, A Social Edition of the Devonshire MS [BL Add MS 17,492] (http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/The_Devonshire_Manuscript), carried out via a research team operating in conjunction with an advisory group representing key expertise in the methods and content-area embraced by the edition.

 

About the Speaker

Ray Siemens headshotRay Siemens (http://web.uvic.ca/~siemens) is Canada Research Chair in Humanities Computing and Distinguished Professor in the Faculty of Humanities at the University of Victoria, in English and Computer Science, and visiting professor at NYU in 2013.  He is founding editor of the electronic scholarly journal Early Modern Literary Studies, and his publications include, among others, Blackwell’s Companion to Digital Humanities (with Schreibman and Unsworth), Blackwell’s Companion to Digital Literary Studies (with Schreibman), A Social Edition of the Devonshire MS,  and  Literary Studies in the Digital Age (MLA, with Price). He directs the Implementing New Knowledge Environments project, the Digital Humanities Summer Institute and the UVic Electronic Textual Cultures Lab, and serves as Vice President of the Canadian Federation of the Humanities and Social Sciences for Research Dissemination and Chair of the Modern Language Association’s Committee on Scholarly Editions, recently serving also as Chair of the international Alliance of Digital Humanities Organisations’ Steering Committee.

30

Oct
2013

In Events of Interest

By Laura Kane

Kathleen Fitzpatrick, “Open Review, the New Peer, and the Future of Scholarly Communication” – Mon, 11/4, 4:15pm-5:30pm, Room 9206/9207

On 30, Oct 2013 | In Events of Interest | By Laura Kane

Please join CUNY DHI and the Digital Praxis Seminar for a talk by Kathleen Fitzpatrick on the future of scholarly communication.
This event will take place on Monday, November 4, 2013 from 4:15-5:30pm at the CUNY Graduate Center in Room 9206/9207, and is free to attend and open to the public.We request you RSVP here, but registration is not mandatory: RSVP with Eventbrite (not required)

Kathleen Fitzpatrick: “Open Review, the New Peer, and the Future of Scholarly Communication”

Recent experiments in open peer review, as well as a recent study of open review practices jointly conducted by MediaCommons and NYU Press, suggest that online scholarly communication may be changing the nature of the “peer,” as well as the shapes of scholarly communities. This presentation will explore the history and future of peer review as a means of thinking through the issues that open review raises for communities of practice online.

 

About The Speaker

2013 croppedKathleen Fitzpatrick is Director of Scholarly Communication of the Modern Language Association and Visiting Research Professor of English at NYU.  She is author of Planned Obsolescence:  Publishing, Technology, and the Future of the Academy (NYU Press, 2011) and of The Anxiety of Obsolescence: The American Novel in the Age of Television (Vanderbilt University Press, 2006). She is co-founder of the digital scholarly network MediaCommons, where she has led a number of experiments in open peer review and other innovations in scholarly publishing.

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William J. Turkel, ” The Hands-On Imperative”- Mon 10/21, 4:15pm-5:30pm, Skylight Room (9100)

On 17, Oct 2013 | In Events of Interest | By Amanda Licastro

Please join CUNY DHI and the Digital Praxis Seminar in welcoming William Turkel for a talk on physical computing and the humanities.

This event will take place Monday, 10/21, from 4:15pm-5:30pm, in the Skylight Room (9100).

This event is free to attend and open to the public. We request you RSVP here, but registration is not mandatory:

http://cunydhi-turkel.eventbrite.com/

The Hands-On Imperative
The idea that “making is thinking,” as Richard Sennett puts it, has always had some place in the humanities.  Until recently, however, it was costly and difficult to produce physical objects.  Now online maker communities, powerful design software, cloud-based services, desktop fabrication and physical computing make it almost as easy for people to make and share artifacts as information or software.  I describe how to set up a makerspace and fab lab for humanists, and why you might want to.
turkelposted-smallBio

William Turkel is engaged in computational history, big history, STS, physical computing, desktop fabrication and electronics. His new monograph, Spark from the Deep, is now available. Turkel is currently working on a study of attempts to build a self-replicating device, from the machine tools of the Industrial Revolution to the RepRaps of today. As part of this research, he has built a series of 3D printers and other CNC tools. The other project Turkel is working on is a study of mid-20th-century analog electronic computing. Turkel teaches Max 6 programming to undergraduates in Western’s new digital humanities option, and to grad students in the interactive exhibit design course. Turkel is also teaching a new graduate course on digital research methods that makes use of command line tools in Linux virtual machines. You can find him on Twitter at @williamjturkel

Open Access Event: Open Access Scholarly Publishing as Thought and Action

On 19, Sep 2011 | In Events of Interest | By Matthew K. Gold

Reposted from the <a href=”https://openaccess.commons.gc.cuny.edu/2011/09/19/open-access-scholarly-publishing-as-thought-and-action/”>Open Access @ CUNY blog</a>:

 

Friday, October 28, 2011
5-7pm
CUNY Graduate Center—Room 9204
free and open to the public

As a culmination of CUNY Open Access Week 2011, and in conjunction with the CUNY Digital Humanities Initiative, this panel will unravel issues surrounding open access scholarly publishing. Our panelists will share their inspiration for becoming open access advocates, their thinking about adopting particular licenses for their work, and the processes through which they have liberated their scholarship—from their perspectives as authors, editors and publishers.

The panel will include:

Members of the Radical Teacher editorial collectiveEmily Drabinski, is an Instruction Librarian at Long Island University, Brooklyn, James Davis and Joseph Entin, both Associate Professors of English at Brooklyn College. Radical Teacher is a socialist, feminist, and anti-racist journal about the theory and practice of teaching. Published in print since 1975, the journal has recently decided to transition to an open access model.

Matthew K. Gold is an Assistant Professor of English at New York City College of Technology and of Interactive Technology and Pedagogy at the CUNY Graduate Center, where he serves as Advisor to the Provost for Master’s Programs and Digital Initiatives. He recently edited the book Debates in the Digital Humanities, which will be published through the University of Minnesota Press in January 2012 both as a printed text and an expanded, open-access edition on the web.

Michael Mandiberg is an artist and Assistant Professor of Media Culture at the College of Staten Island/CUNY and on the Doctoral Faculty of the Interactive Technology and Pedagogy Certificate Program at the CUNY Graduate Center. He is the coauthor ofDigital Foundations: An Intro to Media DesignCollaborative Futures, and the editor ofThe Social Media Reader.

Trebor Scholz is a scholar, artist, professor, chair, organizer and chair of the conference series The Politics of Digital Culture at The New School in NYC. His forthcoming monograph with Polity offers a history of the Social Web and its Orwellian economies. In spring 2011, he co-authored From Mobile Playgrounds to Sweatshop City (with Laura Y. Liu). Scholz is the editor of two collections of essays, Learning Through Digital Media(iDC, 2011) and a volume on digital labor (Routledge, 2012). He also founded theInstitute for Distributed Creativity that is widely known for its online discussions of critical network culture.

For more information about Open Access publishing, and CUNY’s 2011 Open Access Week events, see the Open Access @ CUNY blog on the CUNY Academic Commons, or get in touch with Professor Alycia Sellie: asellie@brooklyn.cuny.edu

 

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September 12: Cathy Davidson on “Now You See It: How the Brain Science of Attention Will Transform the Way We Live, Work, and Learn”

On 24, Jul 2011 | In Events of Interest | By Matthew K. Gold

This upcoming event at the GC will be of interest to many in our group:

Monday, Sept. 12th, 6:30 -8:30 pm, Martin E. Segal Theater

Now You See It: How the Brain Science of Attention Will Transform the Way We Live, Work, and Learn

CATHY N. DAVIDSON is the John Hope Franklin Humanities Institute Professor of Interdisciplinary Studies at Duke University. She has published more than twenty books including Closing: The Life and Death of an American Factory and The Future of Thinking: Learning Institutions in a Digital Age. In December 2010, President Obama nominated Davidson to the National Council on the Humanities and she is currently awaiting confirmation by the Senate. She is the co-founder of HASTAC. JESSE PRINZ, Distinguished Professor of Philosophy, Graduate Center, will serve as discussant. Cosponsored by the Center for the Study of Women and Society and the Center for Humanities.

Digital Humanities and the Future of Libraries

On 07, Jun 2011 | In Events of Interest | By Matthew K. Gold

CUNY DHI members: Please check out this event next week at the New York Public Library:

NYPL Labs presents: Digital Humanities and the Future of Libraries

A conversation in honor of Dr. Paul LeClerc with:

Kari Kraus, Jon Orwant, Dot Porter and Doug Reside

Thursday June 16, 4-6pm at The New York Public Library

Stephen A. Schwarzman Building (42nd St. and 5th Ave.), South Court Auditorium

FREE and open to the public

Since the early days of the field, Digital Humanities practitioners have frequently found allies and collaborators in librarians and archivists. Many early digital humanities projects centered around organizing and making accessible information–two activities at the core of the mission of almost every library. Perhaps for this reason,many of the largest digital humanities centers are physically situated in and often at least partially funded by University libraries.

Nonetheless, the field has traditionally been led (with a few notable exceptions) by faculty from humanities departments rather than by library staff, and libraries have tended to isolate digital humanities centers as somewhat quarantined departments separate from the daily work of the institution. However, as both digital humanities and librarianship develop in the 21st century, there are indications that these walls of separation are beginning to erode. In this panel discussion, NYPL Digital Curator for the Performing Arts,Doug Reside, and three digital humanists from very different backgrounds will discuss the future of libraries and the digital humanities and how these two related, but as yet mostly separate fields, may (or may not) finally converge.

This event is held in honor of outgoing NYPL President Dr. Paul LeClerc, whose vision and passionate advocacy have advanced the frontiers of digital humanities innovation at the Library. The event is sponsored byNYPL Labs, a collaborative team of librarians, curators and technologists developing new ideas and tools for digital research.

Participants

KARI KRAUS is an assistant professor in the College of Information Studies and the Department of English at the University of Maryland. Her research and teaching interests focus on new media and the digital humanities, textual scholarship and print culture, digital preservation, transmedia storytelling, and game studies. Kraus is a local Co-PI on an Institute of Museum and Library Services grant for preserving virtual worlds; a Co-PI on an IMLS Digital Humanities Internship grant; and, with Derek Hansen (iSchool), the Co-Principal Investigator of an NSF grant to study Alternate Reality Games (ARGs) and transmedia storytelling in the service of education and design. In addition to the University of Maryland, she has taught at the University of Rochester and the Eastman School of Music, and in the Art and Visual Technology program at George Mason University.

JON ORWANTis Engineering Manager at Google, where he works on Book Search, Patent Search, visualizations, and the digital humanities, where he recently launched the Google Books Ngram Viewer. He’s the author or co-author of several books on programming, including the bestselling Programming Perl, and published an independent computer magazine. Before joining Google he was the CTO of O’Reilly & Associates and Director of Research for France Telecom. He received his doctorate from MIT’s Electronic Publishing Group in 1999.

DOT PORTER is currently the Associate Director for Content & Services in the Digital Library Program at Indiana University. Ms. Porter holds an MA in Medieval Studies and an MS in Library Science, although after receiving her MSLS rather than going to work in a library, she took a position in a digital humanities center. Over the next seven years she dedicated herself to working with humanities scholars to undertake faculty-driven digital projects. These projects often involved working closely with librarians, and with other scholars, such as computer scientists, as well, but the driving force behind the projects was always the humanities scholar. In June 2010, Ms. Porter came to work in the Digital Library Program at IU and was immediately stuck with a bit of culture shock. Although the technologies used in DL are very similar to those in DH, the aims and goals can be quite different, and working between the two can be an interesting, educational, and engaging experience.

DOUG RESIDE (moderator) became Digital Curator for the Performing Arts at New York Public Library in January of 2011 after serving for four and a half years on the directorial staff of the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities (MITH) at the University of Maryland in College Park. He holds a BS in Computer Science and a BA, MA, and Ph.D. in English Literature. He has been a PI on three earlier startup grants (The Ajax XML Encoder, Music Theatre Online, and the Collaborative Ajax Modeling Platform) and the co-PI with Tanya Clement on the Off the Tracks workshop. Additionally, he is the original project director of the NEH Preservation and Access funded Text Image Linking Environment (TILE) which is scheduled for release in the summer of 2011.

Jason Kucsma
Acting Interim Director & Emerging Technologies Manager
Metropolitan New York Library Council
212.228.2320 x23
www.metro.org

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