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14

Nov
2017

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In Events of Interest

By Javier

Line-up for CUNY Digital Humanities Initiatives Lightning Talks 2017

On 14, Nov 2017 | No Comments | In Events of Interest | By Javier

Event: “Building a Digital Humanities Community at the City University of New York”
Date: Tuesday November 14, 2017
Time: 6:30pm – 8:00pm
Place: Room 9206-07, The Graduate Center, CUNY (365 Fifth Ave., New York)

CUNY Digital Humanities Initiative (DHI) and GC Digital Initiatives (GCDI) invite you to participate in the 3rd annual DHI Lightning Talks event: “Building a Digital Humanities Community at the City University of New York”. This event will take place on Tuesday, November 14th, 2017 from 6:30 pm to 8:30 pm in rooms 9206-9207 at the Graduate Center, CUNY.

The current line-up for the event is as follows:


Communities of Pedagogy

Jill Belli, New York City College of Technology; and Kristen Hackett, The Graduate Center: The OpenLab
Charlie Edwards, New York City College of Technology; and Matt Gold, The Graduate Center: Learning in the Public Square: A Public Platform for Humanities Education
Rachel Rakov, The Graduate Center: Teaching Digital Tools for Lexical Analysis
Luke Waltzer, The Graduate Center: Vocat
Jeremy March, The Graduate Center: The Hoplite Challenge

Communities of Digital Publishing and Visualization

Naomi Barrettara, The Graduate Center: The Metropolitan Opera Guild Podcast
Agustín Indaco, The Graduate Center: Inequaligram
Micki Kaufman, The Graduate Center: Quantifying Kissinger
Matt Gold, The Graduate Center: Retooling the Monograph: The Manifold Scholarship Project
Chung Chang, The Graduate Center (alumnus): FDNY Community Outreach Review and Plan

We will be accepting on-the-go Lightning Talks during the event, so if you missed the sign-up deadline but would still like to present your work, come to the event and sign up on the live whiteboard to present your work!

Please share this call widely with friends and colleagues, so we can make this the most widely attended CUNY Digital Humanities Initiative event thus far.

We are looking forward to seeing new and emerging work from students and scholars across CUNY, as well as catching up on the growth and development of past projects.

For specific questions, please do not hesitate to contact us at lrhody@gc.cuny.edu orjoteropena@gradcenter.cuny.edu.

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13

Nov
2017

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In Spotlight

By Jojo Karlin

Spotlight: Ryan Seslow and NET-ART on the CUNY Academic Commons

On 13, Nov 2017 | No Comments | In Spotlight | By Jojo Karlin

Creator: Ryan Seslow
Project: NET-ART Course & Gallery on the CUNY Academic Commons
Discipline: Communication Technology, Digital Art, Digital Storytelling
Campus: York College
Follow: @ryanseslow

Description:

Over the last 8-10 months I have become an active contributor on the CUNY Academic Commons. (I have also proudly joined the commons’ sub-committee) I think it is a wonderful platform! I see the commons itself is an amazing space for activating creativity and collaboration between CUNY campuses, students, faculty and community members. After some research, ah, yes, I was a “commons voyeur” for a few years to learn and watch what was happening and how I could best contribute something new and of value.

I decided to create the NET-ART course on the Commons.

It began as a disruption (and still does) to the sidebar of the commons’ home page. Every other day I post a new animated GIF or a screen recorded series of Internet Art works that are co-dependent on a web browser to display and archive the works. The animations serve as a colorful contrast to the regularly published content. NET-ART on the commons is indeed an expressive and experimental digital art course, digital art gallery, exhibition space and a platform for interdisciplinary collaboration. An official or formal announcement about the NET-ART course launch has not yet been shared, but perhaps this Spotlight will serve as its introduction!

The Net-Art website on the commons will soon be launching its first series of open calls in three categories:  Animated GIFs, Net-Art & Digital Art / Static / Memes!

This is the “hackable” course description:

“Net-Art is a remote online digital studio art course intended to expose and expand the vocabulary of new media art to the student’s personal visual statements. Students are expected to produce a related series of electronic art works with a concentration on experimentation and the transcendence of ideas. Through various processes, both manual and technology based, students will be exposed to the use and application of electronic media via desktop and mobile art practice. Students may reference their work in conjunction with prior interests in applied arts, photography, video, history, politics, social commentary, performance art as well as any other inter-disciplinary subjects of interest. The course will take place here on this URL using (OER) Open Education Resources, Public Domain and other Creative Commons Sources.”

Over the last several years I have been exhibiting and building online portfolios and repositories of my works:

Please have a look below for examples as they are relevant to the NET-ART Course work:

1. Professor Seslow’s Internet Art Exhibition on the Newhive platform – https://newhive.com/ryanseslow/profile/all

2. Professor Seslow’s Artist Profile on the Giphy Platform – https://giphy.com/ryanseslow/

3. Professor Seslow Art Repository on Flickr – https://www.flickr.com/photos/rmsmovement/

4. Ryan Seslow.com – https://ryanseslow.com – Lots of blog posts and otherness.

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01

Nov
2017

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In Events of Interest

By Javier

Call for Participation: CUNY Digital Humanities Initiative Lightning Talks 2017 (Deadline Extended to November 10)

On 01, Nov 2017 | No Comments | In Events of Interest | By Javier

Call for Lightning Talk Presentations at the 3rd CUNY DHI event: Building a Digital Humanities Community at the City University of New York

CUNY Digital Humanities Initiative (DHI) and GC Digital Initiatives (GCDI) invite you to participate in the 3rd annual DHI Lightning Talks event: “Building a Digital Humanities Community at the City University of New York”. This event will take place on Tuesday, November 14th, 2017 from 6:30 pm to 8:30 pm in rooms 9206-9207 at the Graduate Center, CUNY.

Groups or individuals interested in sharing their work-in-progress are invited to sign up to give 3-5 minute presentations (with a maximum of 3 slides) using this form. The extended deadline to submit applications is Friday, November 10th, 2017.

We invite individual students, faculty, staff or groups from all disciplines to join us and share their ongoing, current, and recent work, and to get a glimpse of the wide variety of digital projects that can be found across The City University of New York. We welcome first-time presenters, as well as those who have participated in past CUNY DHI Lightning Talks.

Please share this call widely with friends and colleagues, so we can make this the most widely attended CUNY Digital Humanities Initiative event thus far.

Proposals may be submitted through this form. Once you have submitted the form, we will contact you with further information about submitting slides.

We are looking forward to seeing new and emerging work from students and scholars across CUNY, as well as catching up on the growth and development of past projects.

Deadline: November 10, 2017

For specific questions, please do not hesitate to contact us at lrhody@gc.cuny.edu or joteropena@gradcenter.cuny.edu.

Click here to sign up for the event.

Image credit: Neurons by Flick user svklimkin (2017). Creative commons license.

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27

Oct
2017

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In Spotlight

By Jojo Karlin

Spotlight: Jeff Allred and Research, Interpretation, Play: Billy Budd as Role-Playing Game via Ivanhoe for WordPress

On 27, Oct 2017 | No Comments | In Spotlight | By Jojo Karlin

slides billy budd_Page_4.png
Project director: Jeff Allred
Project: Research, Interpretation, Play: Billy Budd as Role-Playing Game via Ivanhoe for WordPress
Project type: Digital Pedagogy, Writing
Campus: Hunter College
Follow: @jballred
In the 1970s, Roland Barthes famously promoted a “writerly” mode of reading, in which readers no longer consume texts by simply reading them, but “play” texts like (in Barthes’s metaphor) amateurs gathered around a piano performing a score. Using the Ivanhoe concept developed by textual scholars at the University of Virginia in 2000, Jeff Allred (English, Hunter College) recently had students materialize Barthes’s abstraction, transforming Herman Melville’s Billy Budd into a role-playing game. Students chose roles in and around Melville’s text (e.g., characters, like Billy Budd or Captain Vere, Melville himself, editors, critics) and performed a version of the text collaboratively. The experiment generated increased engagement and fun, to be sure, but it also encouraged students to develop more sophisticated skills in the discipline, as they collaborated with librarians to incorporate significant literary research into the play, examining literary critical, biographical, and cultural historical sources to enhance their play.
Allred’s work on this project will be featured as part of a “digital panel” (along with DHI alumna Erin Rose Glass) at the American Studies Association conference in early November. Check out the panel and comment on the paper, which is annotatable via hypothes.is.

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17

Oct
2017

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In Events of Interest

By Jojo Karlin

GC Digital Initiatives Sound Series: Johanna Devaney

On 17, Oct 2017 | No Comments | In Events of Interest | By Jojo Karlin

 

Registration for the GCDI Sound Series event Thursday, November 16th, 6:30-8:30 is now open.

GC Digital Initiatives Sound Series presents Dr. Johanna Devaney, who will introduce and teach her open-source software, Automatic Music Performance Analysis and Comparison Toolkit. Join us to learn about developing music software and to demo this toolkit for examining intervals between notes, tempo and relative dynamic level between notes, frequency and vibrato.

Read more at GCDI Events.

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16

Oct
2017

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In Spotlight

By Jojo Karlin

Spotlight: Equality Archive

On 16, Oct 2017 | No Comments | In Spotlight | By Jojo Karlin

Creator(s): Shelly Eversley, Associate Professor, English, Baruch College, CUNY
Laurie Hurson, Ph.D. Candidate, Environmental Psychology, The Graduate Center, CUNY
Project: Equality Archive 
Discipline: Feminist Archive, Digital Media
Campus: GC and Baruch

Follow: @EqualityArchive, @ShellyEversley, @Laurhur

The Equality Archive is a digital platform that hosts open access information about the history of sex and gender equality in the United States. Each archive entry contains intersectional and multimodal content in the form of text, images, sound, and video. In its collaborative and transformative approach, the Equality Archive marks a new direction for Open Educational Resources by offering multimodal educational content without copyright restrictions and builds on the feminist practice of collaborative work and socially transformative potential.

Written by a collective of over 25 feminists who are professors, artists, and authors, each archive entry is peer-reviewed and connects readers to opportunities to get involved through volunteering or donating to an established organization already working toward a social good that must include empowered women. As readers explore one entry, they will find connections–intersections–with other entries. They can browse the archive by searching via key words located in Equality Archive’s tag cloud or they can jump between entries through text hyperlinks, images, videos, and other media. By providing access to multimodal, open, and educational content, Equality Archive aims to share information and spark interest so that it can ripple outward, becoming a new wave of knowledge and action in the service of social good.

More information can be found in the Equality Project Statement: Equality Archive: Open Educational Resources as Feminist Praxis

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13

Oct
2017

No Comments

In Spotlight

By Jojo Karlin

Spotlight: QWriting 2.0

On 13, Oct 2017 | No Comments | In Spotlight | By Jojo Karlin

Project director: Kevin Ferguson
Project: QWriting 2.0
Project type: Digital Pedagogy, Writing
Discipline: English
Campus: Queens College
Follow: @KevinLFerguson

Qwriting, a WordPress installation that serves the Queens College community, has over 19,000 users and hosts thousands of sites, including course blogs, student portfolios, and organizational pages. Qwriting 2.0 is a multiyear initiative to build on the Qwriting platform and the communities that rely on it. Over the past year, the Qwriting 2.0 initiative has included programs to support digital writing pedagogy, technical improvements to the Qwriting platform, increased support for teachers making use of Qwriting in their work, and increased support for student blogging initiatives such as QC Voices.

In spring of 2017, the Qwriting 2.0 team began a workshop series in digital writing pedagogy for instructors at Queens. This series, designed to show teachers in a variety of disciplines how best to deploy Qwriting and WordPress in their classrooms, engaged topics such as QWriting for Digital Assignments and Assessment and Strategies for Online Discussion, Annotation, and Collaborative Work. These sessions provide instructors with both the technical skills needed to use WordPress effectively and the space to consider how digital writing pedagogy can augment their own teaching practices.

To provide the Queens College community with a high-impact example of digital writing in practice, Qwriting 2.0 provides support for QC Voices, a flagship site that features student thought on issues such as queerness, social justice, equal representation in literature, and life in New York City. QC Voices highlights not only the diversity in perspective of Queens College students, but also their technical proficiency in both writing and modern digital rhetoric. The Qwriting 2.0 team maintains the site and guides and promotes the work of student bloggers as they create work that is routinely read by hundreds or thousands of visitors, both within and outside the Queens College community.

A critical part of the Qwriting 2.0 initiative is the ongoing evaluation and improvement of the Qwriting platform, including considerations of usability, aesthetics, and performance. In the last year, the Qwriting 2.0 team has made technical improvements to increase the speed of the platform, redesigned the site’s home page and documentation, and rethought the signup and site creation process to better serve common use cases. The team also actively encourages adoption of the platform through consultations, class visits, and office hours.

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11

Oct
2017

No Comments

In Spotlight

By Jojo Karlin

Spotlight: Bret Maney and Mapping New York Literary History

On 11, Oct 2017 | No Comments | In Spotlight | By Jojo Karlin

Project director: Bret Maney
Project type: Mapping, Digital Pedagogy
Discipline: English
Campus: Lehman College
Follow: @jbretmaney
Mapping New York Literary History screenshot

Mapping New York Literary History is a digital public writing project produced by Lehman College English majors enrolled in Bret Maney’s American literature courses. The project engages students in original research and writing about New York locations that have a significant bearing on American literary history. Students document these sites through notes, photographs, videos, and interviews, and carry out library and archival research. The result of their investigations is a series of multimodal essays posted online under their names, initials, or a  pseudonym, and organized through a mapping interface powered by Carto and hosted on the CUNY Academic Commons.

The goal of Mapping New York Literary History is fourfold: (1) to foster student engagement with local literary history and American studies; (2) to introduce students to the practice of writing for digital publics; (3) to enhance students’ digital literacies; and (4) to collaborate in the public humanities mission of sharing our disciplinary expertise with the wider community on the web. Through this project, students’ research and writing becomes a permanent contribution to the digital documentation of our city’s and region’s literary history. Lehman English majors have done some truly remarkable work, and we are excited to share it with you.

To begin exploring the Mapping New York Literary History project, click here. Most essays focus on literary sites within the five boroughs, but follow the river north to the Catskills, go west to Weehawken, NJ, or east to Long Island for more literary excavations!

For a scholarly discussion of the digital pedagogy involved in this project, see Bret Maney’s recent Kairos article, “Critics and Cartographers in the Literature Classroom: Using CARTO and WordPress to Build a Digital Public Writing Project.”

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05

Oct
2017

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In Spotlight

By Jojo Karlin

Spotlight: Art History Teaching Resources

On 05, Oct 2017 | No Comments | In Spotlight | By Jojo Karlin

Project directors: Karen Shelby and Michelle Millar Fisher
Project: Art History Teaching Resources
Project type: Digital Pedagogy
Discipline: Art History
Campus: Baruch
Follow:@a_h_t_r

Each academic year, AHTR publishes a series of blog posts on the AHTR Weekly, an increasingly popular feature at ArtHistoryTeachingResources.org. While these short essays primarily target art historians and museum educators, instructors in other disciplines now look to the Weekly for information about innovative pedagogies, open educational resources, and technology-enhanced teaching. Among topics slated for this year are “What’s Your Sutori? Interactive Study Guides and Active Note-Taking,” “Kimono Wednesdays,” “Bomb the Church,” and other effective Reacting to the Past (RTTP) games,” and “3D Printing.”

Some contributors have developed their Weekly posts into peer-reviewed publications for Art History Pedagogy and Practice, AHTR’s academic e-journal on scholarship of teaching and learning. At conferences, AHTR provides faculty opportunities for professional development and collaborative exchange. In October, AHTR will host a session “Pedagogically Sound Approaches for Hybrid and Online Learning,” at the Southeastern College Art Association (SECAC), and for the second year in a row, AHTR organized a round of lightning talks on teaching and learning for the College Art Association (CAA). These presentations, addressing the “State of the Art (History): Re Examining the Exam,” along with proceedings from our SECAC session will be shared and archived through reflection posts on the AHTR Weekly. AHTR is also excited to partner with CAA’s Education Committee this year on a one-day “boot camp” for faculty interested in conducting Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in Art History, and is planning a special issue of Art History Pedagogy and Practice focused on projects developing from this event.

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02

Oct
2017

In Spotlight

By Jojo Karlin

Spotlight: Matthew Knip and The Philip C. Van Buskirk Archive

On 02, Oct 2017 | In Spotlight | By Jojo Karlin

Project director: Matthew Knip
Project: Philip C. Van Buskirk Archive
Project type: Digital Archives, Digital Publishing
Discipline: English
Campus: GC & Hunter
Follow: @MatthewKnip

Philip Van Buskirk

The Philip C. Van Buskirk Archive employs a small group of CUNY students to digitize and make freely available the first seven years of the unpublished journals of Philip C. Van Buskirk. The nearly-completed archive is free and publicly available for reading and searching. 

Born into the upper class, educated and literate—the son of a Maryland Secretary of State—Van Buskirk “fell” into the working-class, largely illiterate, maritime culture after his father’s suicide. Beginning in 1851 and running for fifty years, he kept an extensive diary of the intimate details of his life and the lives of his fellow sailors. 

The resulting journals provide a unique window into aspects of this working-class world that have proven difficult for scholars to access because they were almost never written down. While the journals present his perspective, they also allow access to voices he discovered in working-class spaces, perspectives that were seldom allowed within written discourse of the time. The journals have the capability to reshape assumptions at the heart of history, art, literary, and cultural criticism.

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