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Art History

05

Oct
2017

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In Spotlight

By Jojo Karlin

Spotlight: Art History Teaching Resources

On 05, Oct 2017 | No Comments | In Spotlight | By Jojo Karlin

Project directors: Karen Shelby and Michelle Millar Fisher
Project: Art History Teaching Resources
Project type: Digital Pedagogy
Discipline: Art History
Campus: Baruch
Follow:@a_h_t_r

Each academic year, AHTR publishes a series of blog posts on the AHTR Weekly, an increasingly popular feature at ArtHistoryTeachingResources.org. While these short essays primarily target art historians and museum educators, instructors in other disciplines now look to the Weekly for information about innovative pedagogies, open educational resources, and technology-enhanced teaching. Among topics slated for this year are “What’s Your Sutori? Interactive Study Guides and Active Note-Taking,” “Kimono Wednesdays,” “Bomb the Church,” and other effective Reacting to the Past (RTTP) games,” and “3D Printing.”

Some contributors have developed their Weekly posts into peer-reviewed publications for Art History Pedagogy and Practice, AHTR’s academic e-journal on scholarship of teaching and learning. At conferences, AHTR provides faculty opportunities for professional development and collaborative exchange. In October, AHTR will host a session “Pedagogically Sound Approaches for Hybrid and Online Learning,” at the Southeastern College Art Association (SECAC), and for the second year in a row, AHTR organized a round of lightning talks on teaching and learning for the College Art Association (CAA). These presentations, addressing the “State of the Art (History): Re Examining the Exam,” along with proceedings from our SECAC session will be shared and archived through reflection posts on the AHTR Weekly. AHTR is also excited to partner with CAA’s Education Committee this year on a one-day “boot camp” for faculty interested in conducting Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in Art History, and is planning a special issue of Art History Pedagogy and Practice focused on projects developing from this event.

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23

Nov
2015

In Events of Interest

By Mary Catherine Kinniburgh

Announcing “The Art of Seeing: Aesthetics at the Intersection of Art and Science”

On 23, Nov 2015 | In Events of Interest | By Mary Catherine Kinniburgh

On behalf of GC Digital Initiatives and The GC Computer Science Colloquium, CUNY DHI is delighted to present the following talk. We hope to see you there!

 

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“The Art of Seeing: Aesthetics at the Intersection of Art and Science”

Thursday, December 10th, 4:15-6:15p
Room C197
The Graduate Center, CUNY.

Featuring:
Emily L. Spratt, Dept. of Art and Archaeology, Princeton University and Ahmed Elgammal, Dept. of Computer Science, Rutgers University

In this two-part presentation, art historian Emily L. Spratt and computer scientist Ahmed Elgammal explore the uses of vision technology for the analysis of art and its philosophical implications for both aesthetic theory and artificial intelligence. Through an investigation of the most fundamental questions computer scientists are confronted with in giving a machine the capacity to see, we demonstrate the value in utilizing methodologies from art history as the field of computer vision has already, in fact, predicted certain categories of interpretation that aid in the analysis of art. Returning to the aesthetic debates inspired by Kant and renewing focus to the art historical theories of iconography and iconology that were prominent in the first half of the twentieth century, basic issues of object classification are examined in relation to vision technology. In this presentation, we hope to demonstrate the merit of bridging the fields of art history and computer science, and to underscore the new challenges aesthetics, in the age of artificial intelligence, face.

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