Posts Tagged ‘digitalhumanities’

Katina Rogers on Alt-Academic Careers: Mon 11/18, 4:15p-5:30p Rooms 9204/9205

November 11th, 2013

Please join CUNY DHI and the Digital Praxis Seminar for a talk by Katina Rogers on Alt-Academic Careers.

This event will take place on Monday, November 18, 2013 from 4:15-5:30pm at the CUNY Graduate Center in Room 9204/9205, and is free to attend and open to the public.We request you RSVP here, but registration is not mandatory: http://www.eventbrite.com/e/katina-rogers-on-alt-academic-careers-mon-1118-415-530pm-room-9204-tickets-9148709035 (not required)

 

Katina Rogers – Alt-Academic Careers

While many graduate programs continue to focus on tenure track placement rates, a growing proportion of humanities scholars are embracing a much broader range of intellectually stimulating careers in, around, and beyond the academy. Focusing both on her own career path and on her research at the Modern Language Association, the Scholarly Communication Institute, and the Scholars’ Lab at the University of Virginia, Katina Rogers will discuss strategies to support professionalization, public scholarship, and career development across a wide array of possible outcomes.

 

About the Speaker

KR_photoKatina Rogers is managing editor of MLA Commons, the Modern Language Association’s new online platform for collaboration and scholarly communication. She previously served as Senior Research Specialist with the Scholarly Communication Institute, a Mellon-funded humanities think tank based in the University of Virginia’s Scholars’ Lab. Her current research focuses on graduate education reform, career paths for humanities scholars, and innovative modes of scholarly production. Katina holds a Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from the University of Colorado.

Kathleen Fitzpatrick, “Open Review, the New Peer, and the Future of Scholarly Communication” – Mon, 11/4, 4:15pm-5:30pm, Room 9206/9207

October 30th, 2013
Please join CUNY DHI and the Digital Praxis Seminar for a talk by Kathleen Fitzpatrick on the future of scholarly communication.
This event will take place on Monday, November 4, 2013 from 4:15-5:30pm at the CUNY Graduate Center in Room 9206/9207, and is free to attend and open to the public.We request you RSVP here, but registration is not mandatory: RSVP with Eventbrite (not required)

Kathleen Fitzpatrick: “Open Review, the New Peer, and the Future of Scholarly Communication”

Recent experiments in open peer review, as well as a recent study of open review practices jointly conducted by MediaCommons and NYU Press, suggest that online scholarly communication may be changing the nature of the “peer,” as well as the shapes of scholarly communities. This presentation will explore the history and future of peer review as a means of thinking through the issues that open review raises for communities of practice online.

 

About The Speaker

2013 croppedKathleen Fitzpatrick is Director of Scholarly Communication of the Modern Language Association and Visiting Research Professor of English at NYU.  She is author of Planned Obsolescence:  Publishing, Technology, and the Future of the Academy (NYU Press, 2011) and of The Anxiety of Obsolescence: The American Novel in the Age of Television (Vanderbilt University Press, 2006). She is co-founder of the digital scholarly network MediaCommons, where she has led a number of experiments in open peer review and other innovations in scholarly publishing.

May 31: Archiving Catastrophe – Digital Humanities & Times of Disaster

May 25th, 2012

Please join us on Thursday, May 31, 2012, when three leading Digital Humanists will take part in a panel discussion that addresses DH-related efforts to archive and preserve materials after catastrophic events.

Thursday, May 31, 2012, 6:30pm-8:30pm

Room 6496, CUNY Graduate Center

Archiving Catastrophe: Digital Humanities & Times of Disaster

Paul Millar (University of Canterbury, New Zealand), Tom Scheinfeldt (George Mason University), and Steve Brier (CUNY Graduate Center)

Please RSVP here

In the months since a 7.1 magnitude earthquake hit New Zealand’s Canterbury province in September 2010, the region has experienced over ten thousand aftershocks, 430 above magnitude 4.0. The most devastating aftershock, a 6.2 earthquake under the centre of Christchurch on 22 February 2011, had one of the highest peak ground acceleration rates ever recorded. This event claimed 185 lives, damaged 80% of the central city beyond repair, and forced the abandonment of 6,000 homes. It is the third costliest insurance event in history. Paul Millar, project leader of the CEISMIC Canterbury Earthquakes Digital Archive, will discuss the role of Digital Humanities in developing an international resource to preserve the digital record of the earthquakes’ impacts and the long-term process of recovery.

The Hurricane Digital Memory Bank, based at the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media (RRCHNM) at George Mason University, uses electronic media to collect, preserve, and present the stories and digital record of Hurricanes Katrina, Rita, and Wilma. The project contributes to the ongoing effort by historians and archivists to preserve the record of these storms by collecting first-hand accounts, on-scene images, blog postings, and podcasts. Tom Scheinfeldt, Managing Director of RRCHNM, will discuss both this project and, with CUNY Grad Center’s Steve Brier, the September 11 Digital Archive.

The September 11 Digital Archive uses electronic media to collect, preserve, and present the history of the September 11, 2001 attacks in New York, Virginia, and Pennsylvania and the public responses to them. Funded by a major grant from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation and organized by the American Social History Project at the Graduate Center and at RRCHNM, the work of the Archive is not only to gather digital materials related to the attacks but also to assess how history is being recorded and preserved in the twenty-first century, and to develop free software tools to help historians do a better job of collecting, preserving, and writing history. To these ends the Archive has partnered with the Library of Congress, which in September 2003 accepted the Archive into its permanent collections – an event that both ensured the Archive’s long-term preservation and marked the Library’s first major digital acquisition.

All three projects seek to foster positive legacies of terrible events by allowing the people affected to tell their stories in their own words, which as part of the historical record will remain accessible to a wide audience for generations to come.

About Paul Millar:
Associate Professor Paul Millar is the Head of the Department of English, Cinema and Digital Humanities at the University of Canterbury, New Zealand. His research interests include New Zealand and Pacific literature, literary biography, digital textual scholarship and Australasian attitudes to China. In 2001 he co-founded the New Zealand Electronic Text Centre, and he is currently focused on adding functionality to the CEISMIC Canterbury Earthquakes federated digital archive.

About Tom Scheinfeldt:
Tom Scheinfeldt is Managing Director of the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media and Research Assistant Professor of History in the Department of History and Art History at George Mason University. He has lectured and written extensively on the history of popular science, the history of museums, history and new media, and the changing role of history in society, and has worked on traditional exhibitions and digital projects at the Colorado Historical Society, the Museum of the History of Science in Oxford, The Louisiana State Museum, the National Museum of American History, and the Library of Congress. In addition to managing general operations at RRCHNM, Scheinfeldt directs several of its online history projects, including Omeka, THATCamp, One Week | One Tool, the September 11 Digital Archive, the Hurricane Digital Memory Bank, the Papers of the War Department, 1784-1800, and Gulag: Many Days, Many Lives. He gave a memorable talk here at CUNY DHI in December 2010.

About Steve Brier:
Dr. Stephen Brier founded the Interactive Technology and Pedagogy Certificate Program at The Graduate Center in 2002 and serves as its Coordinator. He is a historian and a member of the doctoral faculty in Urban Education who has published widely in text, video, and various forms of multimedia on issues from U.S. history to the uses of interactive technology to improve teaching and learning. He was the founding director of The Graduate Center’s American Social History Project/Center for Media and Learning and was the executive producer of the award-winning “Who Built America?” multimedia curriculum, including textbooks, videos, and CD-ROMs. He has co-produced other award-winning websites, including “History Matters” and the “September 11 Digital Archive”. Brier, who previously served for eleven years as a senior administrator at The Graduate Center, is also the institution’s Senior Academic Technology Officer and the co-director of its New Media Lab.

May 8: Ramona Hernández and Anthony Stevens-Acevedo on the Spanish Paleography Digital Teaching and Learning Tool

May 3rd, 2012

Please join us on Tuesday, May 8, 2012 when the leaders of the Spanish Paleography Digital Teaching and Learning Tool project, funded by a Digital Humanities Start-Up Grant awarded by the NEH’s Office of Digital Humanities, will visit CUNY DHI to discuss their work to date. The project aims to teach users the paleographic skills required to decode early-modern Spanish manuscripts.

Tuesday, May 8, 2012, 6:30pm-8:30pm
Room 6496, CUNY Graduate Center

The Spanish Paleography Digital Teaching and Learning Tool
Ramona Hernández and Anthony Stevens-Acevedo, CUNY Dominican Studies Institute, City College

The Spanish Paleography Digital Teaching and Learning Tool aims to teach users how to decode and read the now abstruse three main handwriting styles in fashion in the early modern Spanish-language world. At the heart of the project is the creation of a website prototype where visitors will be able to consult, on the same screen, different samples of early-modern Spanish handwritings and line-by-line transcriptions into contemporary typeface. By a basic process of repeated visual comparison, the users learn how to decipher or decode the early-modern Spanish manuscripts – a learning that still today, for the most part, is restricted to very specialized university, archives and library settings.  Allowing Internet users worldwide to access this learning at any time will hopefully entice more students and scholars in the Humanities to conduct research on the early-modern Spanish world, while democratizing access to the paleographic skills involved.

 

About Ramona Hernández:
Dr. Ramona Hernández is director of the Dominican Studies Institute of the City University of New York (CUNY) housed at The City College of New York, and is Professor of Sociology at City College and on the faculty of the Graduate Center, CUNY.  She serves as a trustee of the International Institute of Advanced Studies in the Social Sciences (Instituto Global de Altos Estudios en Ciencias Sociales) of the Dominican Republic. Dr. Hernández earned the Ph.D. and M.Phil. in Sociology from the Graduate Center, CUNY; an M.A. in Latin American and Caribbean Studies from New York University; and the B.A. in Latin American History from Lehman College. She is also author of pioneering texts in the areas of migration, labor, and Dominican studies, including The Mobility of Workers Under Advanced Capitalism: Dominican Migration to the United States (named Outstanding Academic Title by Choice, 2002) and, as co-author, The Dominican Americans (1998). She is a trustee of the Sociological Initiatives Foundation.

 

About Anthony Stevens-Acevedo:
Anthony Stevens-Acevedo is assistant director and founding member of the Dominican Studies Institute of the City University of New York (CUNY DSI) at The City College of New York. He is a founding member of the Council of Dominican Educators, the Dominican Studies Association, and a Foreign Corresponding Member of the Dominican Academy of History (Dominican Republic). Stevens-Acevedo is a historian and focuses his research on the early colonial history of the Dominican Republic. He is the lead investigator in CUNY DSI’s Dominican colonial research projects.  He has an M.A. in History from The City College of New York, CUNY, and a B.A. in History of the Americas from the University of Seville, Spain.  He is currently a student in the History Program at the CUNY Graduate Center.

 

Dr. Hernández and Stevens-Acevedo have recently co-authored the chapter ‘Dominican Americans’ for ‘Multicultural America: An Encyclopedia of the Newest Americans,’ Ronald H. Baylor, editor, 2011.  In 2011 they co-edited a special issue on Dominicans in the United States of “Camino Real,” the Journal of Instituto Franklin of the University of Alcalá, Spain, devoted to the Hispanic world in the United States.

May 1: Doug Reside (NYPL) on the Digital Creative Process of Jonathan Larson’s RENT

April 26th, 2012

Please join us on Tuesday, May 1, 2012 when we will be delighted to host Doug Reside of the New York Public Library.

 

“How do you document real life?: Discovering the Digital Creative Process of Jonathan Larson’s RENT”
Doug Reside, New York Public Library

Tuesday, May 1, 2012, 6:30pm-8:30pm
Room 6496, CUNY Graduate Center

Doug Reside will discuss his attempts to reconstruct the creative process that produced the musical RENT by recovering and studying the digital drafts from Jonathan Larson’s original floppy disks.  Reside will also offer some reflections on his newly minted position as Digital Curator of the Performing Arts at New York Public Library and will suggest strategies libraries may employ for dealing with the coming onslaught of born digital research collections.

About Doug Reside:

Doug Reside became the first Digital Curator of the Performing Arts at New York Public Library in February of 2011 after serving for four and a half years on the directorial staff of the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities (MITH) at the University of Maryland in College Park.  He has led numerous Digital Humanities projects and is currently editing the Musical of the Month blog at NYPL which makes available one musical theater libretto each month in various ebook formats.

Oct 18: DH in the Classroom: Shannon Mattern & Mark Sample

October 13th, 2011

Please join us on Tuesday October 18, 2011, when we are excited to welcome two innovative practitioners of “Digital Humanities in the Classroom” – The New School’s Shannon Mattern, and Mark Sample, of George Mason University.

Details are below; we look forward to seeing you there!

Time & Place: Tuesday October 18, 2011, 6:30-8:30pm, Room 6496, CUNY Graduate Center


Shannon Mattern, “Beyond the Seminar Paper: Setting New Standards for New Forms of Student Work”

By exploring how new technologies might function as teaching tools or platforms on which students can demonstrate their learning, we expand the means and ends of education. With this increasing openness of pedagogical forms comes the responsibility to justify our choices and develop new forms of criticism and modes of assessment. Using several of my own courses as examples, I’ll address the challenges and potential benefits of holding students, and ourselves, accountable for the choices we make in our classrooms and advising relationships. I’ll focus on the value of (1) student documentation of their learning process, and in particular (2) students’ justification of their chosen methods and modes of presentation; (3) collaborative development of criteria for evaluation; and (4) connecting our work in the classroom to larger public problems and public institutions.

Suggested readings:

 

Mark Sample, “Building and Sharing When You’re Supposed to be Teaching”

My pedagogy can increasingly be summed up in five words: “Make things. And share them.” I will talk briefly about my move toward assignments and projects in the undergraduate humanities classroom that emphasize making—as opposed to simply writing. I will also address the sharing aspect of these projects, which I see as a critical intervention into the enclosured experience most students have in higher education.

Suggested readings:

 

Shannon Mattern is an Assistant Professor of Media Studies and Film at The New School and was, from 2006 to 2009, director of the Masters in Media Studies program. Her research and teaching focus on relationships among media, architectural, and urban space. Her book, The New Downtown Library, was supported by the Graham and Mellon foundations and published by the University of Minnesota Press in 2007. She has also published in several edited volumes and in journals including Space and Culture, Public Culture, and the Journal of Architectural Education. Her classes, which regularly involve the use of digital media, have resulted in the creation of exhibitions and installations and, in Fall 2010, thanks to the support of an Innovations in Education grant from The New School, a prototype of an open-source mapping tool for scholarly urban research. She is a recipient of The New School’s 2011 Distinguished University Teaching Award.

Mark Sample is an Assistant Professor in the Department of English at George Mason University, where is he also an affiliated faculty member with GMU’s undergraduate Honors College, its Cultural Studies doctoral program, and the Center for History and New Media. His research focuses on contemporary fiction, electronic literature, and videogames. His examination of the representation of torture in videogames was recently published in Game Studies, and he is working on a collaboratively written book about the Commodore 64 home computer. Mark has work in Hacking the Academy, a crowdsourced scholarly book forthcoming in print by the digitalculturebooks imprint of the University of Michigan Press. Mark has recently remixed the entire text of Hacking the Academy as Hacking the Accident. Mark is also an outspoken advocate of open source pedagogy and open source research. In recognition of his commitment to innovation in teaching, he was the recipient of George Mason’s 2010 Teaching Excellence Award. He is a regular contributor to ProfHacker, a feature at the Chronicle for Higher Education that focuses on pedagogy and scholarly productivity, and he also writes for Play the Past, a collaboratively edited scholarly blog that explores the intersection of cultural heritage and games.

This event is co-sponsored by The CUNY Digital Humanities Initiative and the CUNY Digital Studies Group, in partnership with The Center for the Humanities at The Graduate Center, CUNY.

Digital Humanities Syllabi

June 6th, 2011

Do you teach a digital humanities course? Let us know by leaving a comment on this post. We’ll add it to the DH Syllabi page of the CUNY Digital Humanities Resource Guide, which is published on the wiki of the CUNY Academic Commons. I’ve embedded the DH Syllabi wiki page below.

DH Syllabi


DH Programs

The following institutions have DH MA programs. (For more details, see Miriam Posner's list).

  • King’s College London
  • Loyola University Chicago
  • University of Alberta
  • University College London
  • University College Cork

Tanya Clement has collected a list of Digital Humanities Inflected Undergraduate Programs as of 2009 with additions in the comments. This post also has useful links to discussions about DH education.


The Zotero group "Digital Humanities Education," launched by Lisa Spiro, is collaboratively building a library that "includes syllabi and curriculum planning documents, as well as articles about open education, networked pedagogies, and more." This will be an invaluable resource for the DH community, and much more comprehensive than what we offer here.


DH-related syllabi

The number of DH courses has grown exponentially in recent semesters. Instead of updating individual syllabus links, we are keeping the previous list below, and directing researchers instead to collections like these.


A brief selection of DH-related syllabi. To submit syllabi for this list, please use this form.

Undergraduate syllabi

2008

  • Sample, Mark. George Mason University, Fall 2008. ENGL 343: "Textual Media"; syllabus

2009

  • Hirsch, Brett D. University of Victoria, Winter 2009. HUMA 250: "Digital Representation and Creation in a Humanities Context." course website

2010

  • Davidson, Cathy. Duke University, Spring 2010, ISIS 120S-01/English 173S-05: "This is Your Brain on the Internet" syllabus
  • Fitzpatrick, Kathleen. Pomona College, Spring 2010. Media Studies 168: "Writing Machines" syllabus
  • Harris, Katherine D. San Jose State University, Fall 2010. English 190 Honors Colloquium: "Digital Literature: The Death of Print Culture?”; syllabus
  • McClurken, Jeff. University of Mary Washington, Spring 2010. HIST4713C: "Adventures in Digital History" syllabus
  • Schlitz, Stephanie. Bloomsburg University, Fall 2010. "Digital Humanities: Transforming Through Technology"; [link needed]
  • Timney, Meagan. University of Victoria, Fall 2010. HUMA 150: "Tools, Techniques, and Culture of the Digital Humanities" (based on an earlier course developed by Brett D. Hirsch); course website; syllabus

2011

  • Brown, Jim. Wayne State University, Winter 2011. English 5992: "New Media And The Futures Of Writing" syllabus
  • Croxall, Brian. Emory University, Fall 2011. English 389, "Introduction to Digital Humanities" syllabus ; website
  • Clement, Tanya. University of Texas at Austin. Fall 2011. INF 385t, "Introduction to the Digital Humanities" course site ; syllabus
  • Davidson, Cathy. Spring 2011. English 90: "Industrial Origins of the Digital Age" course description
  • Fyfe, Paul. Florida State University, Fall 2011. ENG 5933-03, Introduction to the Digital Humanities draft syllabus
  • Owens, Trevor. American University, Spring 2011. HIST 377/677: "History in the Digital Age" syllabus
  • Rieder, David M. and Brock, Kevin. North Carolina State University, Fall 2011. IP 295: "Introduction to Humanities Physical Computing" syllabus
  • Theibault, John. Stockton College, Spring 2011. GAH 3223: "Introduction to Digital Humanities" syllabus

2012

  • Cordell, Ryan. St. Norbert's College, January 2012. GENS 410: "Technologies of Text" draft syllabus
  • Ullyot, Michael. University of Calgary, Winter 2012. ENGL 203, "Hamlet in the Humanities Lab" description


Graduate syllabi

2009

2010

  • Brier, Stephen and Gold, Matthew K. CUNY Graduate Center, Spring 2010. ITCP 70020: "Interactive Technology and the University"; syllabus
  • Parry, Dave. University of Texas at Dallas, Spring 2010. EMAC 6361: "After/Print" course website
  • Petrik, Paula. George Mason University, Spring 2010. HIST 697: "History & New Media" course website
  • Smulyan, Susan. Brown University, Spring 2010. AMCV220: "Digital Scholarship" course website; syllabus

2011

  • Rieder, David M. North Carolina State University: Fall 2011, ENG 798 / ENG 583, “Introduction to Humanities Physical Computing” syllabus
  • Sinclair, Stéfan. McGill University: Fall 2011, LLCU-602: "Digital Humanities: New Approaches to Scholarship" syllabus

2012

  • Brier, Steve and Gold, Matthew K., CUNY Graduate Center, Spring 2012. MALS 78100: "Digital Humanities in Research and Teaching" course site
  • Presner, Todd. UCLA, Winter 2012. DH 201/Comp Lit 290 Graduate Seminar: "Introduction to Digital Humanities: Humanistic Knowledge, Disciplines, and Institutions in the 21st Century" syllabus
Professional Development

There is an emerging push for DH courses aimed at providing skills training for those who are already working in the field, or would like to join it. The skills that should be required of DHers, though, is a topic of some contention.



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May 4: Douglas Armato on “Digital Media’s Prehistory and the Nine Lives of Scholarly Publishing”

April 29th, 2011

Please join us on Wednesday, May 4, 2011, when we are excited to welcome Douglas Armato, Director of the University of Minnesota Press and Editor of its Digital Culture Studies List, to speak on “Digital Media’s Prehistory and the Nine Lives of Scholarly Publishing.”

Scholarly publishing has survived through adaptation and economic reinvention and now faces new challenges, and opportunities, as the market for ebooks reaches escape velocity and the emergence of the digital humanities reconfigures academic work. Doug’s talk will discuss how university presses are adapting both individually and collectively to the digital environment and how presses remain a vital counterforce to the diminished status of of the humanities in higher education.

This will our last public event of the semester – we very much hope you can attend.  We would also like to take the opportunity to thank all of you who have participated in CUNY DHI, online or in person, and helped to make the group’s first year such a success. We look forward to next year’s activities!

Doug’s talk is co-sponsored by The CUNY Digital Humanities Initiative and the CUNY Digital Studies Group, in partnership with The Center for the Humanities at The Graduate Center, CUNY.

Time & Place: Wednesday, May 4, 2011, 6:30-8:30pm, Room C201/202, CUNY Graduate Center

Feb. 23: Patrik Svensson on “Designing the Digital Humanities”

February 17th, 2011

We are delighted that on Wednesday, February 23, we will be hosting Patrik Svensson, director of HUMlab at Umeå University, Sweden, for a talk entitled “Designing the Digital Humanities.”

Patrik tells us: “The digital humanities are being built and negotiated at this point in time by universities, departments, scholars, programmers, funding agencies, construction workers and various other people and institutions. Drawing on my four-article series on the digital humanities and my own take on the field, I will talk about understanding, building and designing the digital humanities. I will use HUMlab at Umeå University as a starting point, and will also be showing some material – including photos and film clips – from the lab. The discussion will range from visions and design parameters to material manifestations such as a brand-new led-based ceiling light fixture/screen and a plant wall. Questions raised include: What choices do we need to make? What are the underlying visions? What basic values are important? What cyberinfrastructure do we need? Can there be a no-tent digital humanities? What is the advantage of physical lab or studio spaces? Can the digital humanities change the world (or at least the academy)? I combine analytical work on the digital humanities as a field and project with a strong engagement in the future of the field.”

Patrik’s talk launches our public meetings for the Spring semester (see the full schedule), and is co-sponsored by the CUNY Digital Humanities Initiative and the CUNY Digital Studies Group, in partnership with The Center for the Humanities at The Graduate Center, CUNY.

Please join us for this exciting event.

Time & place: Wednesday, February 23, 2011, 6:30pm-8:30pm, CUNY Graduate Center, Room 9205.

CUNY Digital Humanities Initiative Spring 2011 Schedule

February 16th, 2011

Following up on our wonderful inaugural speaker series last Fall, we are very pleased to announce our schedule for the Spring 2011 semester. Our theme this Spring is DIY Digital Humanities.

The events are co-sponsored by the CUNY Digital Studies Group, and presented in partnership with The Center for the Humanities at The Graduate Center, CUNY. We hope you will be able to join us.

Wednesday, February 9, 2011: DIY DH at CUNY
6:30-8:30pm
New Media Lab, CUNY Graduate Center

“DIY DH”

Our theme for this semester is “DIY DH.” In this spirit, group members Lauren Klein, Sarah Ruth Jacobs, Cynthia Tobar, Bronwen Densmore, Amanda Licastro, Charlie Edwards, and Matthew Gold have volunteered to share their experiences using digital technologies in their classrooms and research. On the agenda: using off-the-shelf tools in Macaulay Honors College seminars, WordPress plugins for the paperless and networked classroom, Omeka and the Mina Rees library, and reports from recent THATCamps and the MLA Convention.

Wednesday, February 23, 2011: Patrik Svensson (Umeå University, Sweden) on “Designing the Digital Humanities”
6:30-8:30pm
Room 9205, CUNY Graduate Center

“Designing the Digital Humanities”

The digital humanities are being built and negotiated at this point in time by universities, departments, scholars, programmers, funding agencies, construction workers and various other people and institutions. Drawing on my four-article series on the digital humanities and my own take on the field, I will talk about understanding, building and designing the digital humanities. I will use HUMlab at Umeå University as a starting point, and will also be showing some material – including photos and film clips – from the lab. The discussion will range from visions and design parameters to material manifestations such as a brand-new led-based ceiling light fixture/screen and a plant wall. Questions raised include: What choices do we need to make? What are the underlying visions? What basic values are important? What cyberinfrastructure do we need? Can there be a no-tent digital humanities? What is the advantage of physical lab or studio spaces? Can the digital humanities change the world (or at least the academy)? I combine analytical work on the digital humanities as a field and project with a strong engagement in the future of the field.

Patrik Svensson is the director of HUMlab at Umeå University, Sweden.

Wednesday, March 9, 2011: David L. Hoover (NYU) on “New-Fangled/Old-Fashioned Digital Literary Studies”
6:30-8:30pm
Room 6417, CUNY Graduate Center

“New-Fangled/Old-Fashioned Digital Literary Studies”

Although computational approaches to literary studies have a relatively long history, dating back to at least the 1960′s, the recent explosive growth in the availability of digital texts and the increasing power of digital tools has encouraged new methods and techniques. David’s talk will take a look at some of the kinds of literary analysis that are possible only with digital texts and digital tools, and then focus in a bit more depth on a relatively new method of extracting the characteristic vocabulary of an author, text, or group.

David L. Hoover is Professor of English at New York University.

Wednesday, March 30 2011: Kathleen Fitzpatrick (Pomona College) on “Peer Review, Open Scholarship, and the Digital Humanities”
6:30-8:30pm
Room 6417, CUNY Graduate Center

“Peer Review, Open Scholarship, and the Digital Humanities”

Peer review is the sine qua non of the academy: we use it in nearly everything we do, and cannot imagine what scholarship would be without it. But for such a crucial component of the ways that we work, none of us are wholly satisfied with it, either. Moreover, conventional forms of peer review are often misaligned with the kinds of open scholarship being produced in the digital humanities. This talk takes a brief look at the history and the present criticism of peer review as a means of exploring its future, particularly as scholarly publishing moves increasingly online: what might peer review that took advantage of the reputation economies developed within networked communities look like, and how might it help scholarly communication flourish?

Kathleen Fitzpatrick is Professor of Media Studies at Pomona College.

Wednesday, May 4, 2011: Douglas Armato (University of Minnesota Press) on “Digital Media’s Prehistory and the Nine Lives of Scholarly Publishing“
6:30-8:30pm
Room C201/202, CUNY Graduate Center

“Digital Media’s Prehistory and the Nine Lives of Scholarly Publishing“

Scholarly publishing has survived through adaptation and economic reinvention and now faces new challenges, and opportunities, as the market for ebooks reaches escape velocity and the emergence of the digital humanities reconfigures academic work. The Director of the University of Minnesota Press and editor of its list in digital culture studies discusses how university presses are adapting both individually and collectively to the digital environment and how presses remain a vital counterforce to the diminished status of of the humanities in higher education.

Douglas Armato is Director of the University of Minnesota Press and Editor of its Digital Culture Studies List.

We would also like to let you know about a related event sponsored by the CUNY Digital Studies Group:

Wednesday, March 23, 2011: Jay Rosen, New York University and C.W. Anderson, College of Staten Island/CUNY
6:30-8:30pm
Room C198, CUNY Graduate Center

“The People Formerly Known as the Audience: Five Years Later”

Jay Rosen is Associate Professor NYU, C.W. Anderson, Assistant Professor College of Staten Island/CUNY

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